Category Archives: Gallery / Exhibition Review

20×16 at Cass Contemporary Tampa

Today’s burgeoning urban art scene has been cutting new trails into the Tampa Bay area lately and may have found a good place to set up camp on South MacDill Avenue.

After the successful “SHINE on St. Pete” mural festival and accompanying “Leave a Message” exhibit at the Morean Arts Center last fall, Cass Contemporary followed up with the show “Corrosively Bright,” featuring work by 12 artists, including international heavy-hitters like Ben Frost and Shark Toof. They also hosted the notorious Secret Walls live illustration battle with artists Frank Forte, Denial, Greg Mike, and local favorite BASK.

Cass Contemporary now has brought together 40 artists for its “20×16” exhibition, running through Feb. 13.

To ring in the new year, gallery owners Jake & Cassie Greatens asked this carefully curated group of artists to create works that were exactly 20 inches by 16 inches for this show. Next year they plan to do a “20×17” show.

A week ago, scores of people converged on the gallery, where live music played and projections flickered on a wall. The dance of the night was the “gallery shuffle,” moving from one artwork to the next, pausing only to discuss perceived merits or missteps. Cass had a full-page ad for the show in Juxtapoz magazine, an oracle of art and culture for the past decade. Art Week Miami may have been last month, but that vibe migrated to Tampa, at least for this one night.

“We wanted something that made us stand out and made the art stand out,” said co-owner Cassie Greatens, “and to bring a new art scene to Tampa.

“The idea was to show Tampa 40 different artists, and to put something in the space that’s good for everyone, not just different styles but also the price point, there’s a variety of prices and styles, and I feel like anyone can come in here and find something they like,” Greatens said.

With so many different artists there’s not a binding theme in this exhibit, but the size constraint does make it feel like a cohesive show.

There’s an urban/street art feel to many of the pieces exhibited. A majority of the artists have, in fact, made their bones by spray painting on outdoor walls before they moved to indoor works on gallery walls.

St. Pete painter BASK is a stand-out. His work titled “Debate” hangs alone on a smaller wall of the gallery. It offers the viewer an obscured scene of two wolves fiercely attacking each other, but seen through a finely painted grid of hexagons that give the impression of chicken wire and blood spatter.

“Debate” by St. Petersburg artist BASK, in acrylic, latex and enamel on box frames.

“It seems like a fitting piece given the escalating political climate, and given that it’s an election year and so forth,” said BASK about his painting.

Another local artist, Pale Horse, contributed his two mixed-media illustration pieces titled “Forbidden Knowledge” resembling polished enamel and copper etchings. In these cleanly executed works, a hand hovers just above a trio of mushrooms that are guarded by a devilishly decorated and fork-tongued serpent. These pieces feel like new versions of ancient icons.

Speaking of icons, there’s no lack of pop-art iconography in this exhibition. In 1962, Andy Warhol put his giant thumb down on the art world, and 50-plus years later, some artists are still struggling to get out from under it.

One could grab a handful of dice with the usual pop-art suspects printed on their sides. Things like: cartoon character, super model, couture emblem, graffiti tag, dollar bill, soft-drink logo, etc, then just roll the dice and paint whatever comes up together. (Wait, did I just give away the best idea for a pop-art app?)

Anyway, this often results in a less-than-inspiring combination, but once in a while you’d throw a true winning roll.

“Equality of Paint” mixed media by Rene Gagnon

Massachusetts-born artist Rene Gagnon certainly has a winner with his piece “Equality of Paint” which presents a spray-paint can adorned with the Campbell’s Soup logo, accompanied by a rainbow background and the word “equality” replacing the soup variety. The frame is even spattered with a rainbow of paint, which brings the piece together. It rises above the simplicity of its blatant appropriation to make a real statement for our time.

“Nadi” oil on board by Miami artist Tatiana Suarez

Another winning painting strays pretty far from the typical imagery and brings us the masterful and mystical visage of “Nadi,” a character brought to life by Miami native Tatiana Suarez. Her exotic and mythological large-eyed figures first got my attention at SCOPE Art Miami in 2014, and I was delighted to see her work in the gallery.

Local star Tes One (along with BASK & Pale Horse) has been bringing creative color to some of the Bay area’s well-trafficked walls, most notably a five-story mural on the Poe Parking Garage in downtown Tampa. For this exhibit, his acrylic on wood piece titled “Frostbite” was drawing a warm reception from gallery visitors.

Michigan artist Kelly Allen had perhaps the most unique piece in the show, a simplistic face, seemingly finger-painted into deep, rippling stripes of vibrant color. Titled “Cocoon,” it pulls you in and demands contemplation.

“Cocoon” 2015, Plastisol on canvas, by Kelly Allen.

Others that need mentioning are Greg Gossel’s puzzle-like wood collage “Butterfly,” Chris Buzelli’s elephant/tiger/monkey beast titled “Lotus” and Beau Stanton’s surrealist oil painting “Elysian Voyage.”

But these are just my favorites. You should visit the gallery and pick out your own.

 

LINK: Cass Contemporary


Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks

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Late in the 1980s, burgeoning New York art collector Larry Warsh acquired a series of eight, common composition notebooks from members of a seemingly-defunct and little-known band called “Gray.” Those notebooks sat boxed in a closet of Warsh’s Manhattan apartment for more than 25 years. Now they are on a touring exhibition from the Brooklyn Museum, with stops at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, and the Pérez Art Museum in Miami, and the books are likely reaching a much bigger audience than the band ever attracted back at C.B.G.B.’s in 1980.

Of course, these aren’t just any notebooks. “Gray” isn’t just any band born in the Bowery. And it turns out that Larry Warsh is a damn good judge of groundbreaking art.

The sparsely-filled books contain years of hand-written notes by revolutionary artist Jean-Michel Basquiat and they seem to offer a peep-hole in to the mind of that unconventional genius. This exhibit presents pages from the notebooks alongside a selection of his larger compositions, providing the visitor an in-depth exploration of the Basquiat lexicon that is both verbal and visual.

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View from the Basquiat exhibition at the High Museum of Art.

Basquiat started the band, eventually called “Gray” with performance artist Michael Holman in 1979. They, with various other bandmates, played their ambient/industrial music at the usual downtown haunts, but with growing recognition of his visual artistic talent, Basquiat left the band in mid 1980. It was right about then his career seemed to lasso a shooting star and the artist struggled to hold on tight for as long as he could.

Surviving band members reunited to play at Basquiat’s memorial service in 1988 and again more recently for art happenings and music festivals. In 2011 they even released a “new” album “Shades of…” which includes cuts of  the late Basquiat’s voice and music.

GRAY – SHADES OF… from Plushsafe Records.

 

But this is about the notebooks…

View from the Basquiat exhibition at the High Museum of Art.

Since the beginning, Basquiat’s artistic efforts have focused on words and short phrases. The SAMO@ graffiti he perpetrated with school friend Al Diaz in the late seventies often seemed like excerpts of Beat poetry.

MICROWAVE & VIDEO X-SISTANCE
“BIG MAC” CERTIFICATE
FOR X-MAS
-SAMO©

Even after his painting evolved from street walls, to paper and fabric, to canvas and wood installations, these words and phrases infiltrated every aspect of Basquiat’s artwork. In fact they seem to be the actual essence of it, merely enhanced by the more visually dominant graphic elements.

Basquiat – Untitled, 1982–83. Oilstick, colored pencil, crayon, and gouache on paper mounted on canvas. Collection of Fred Hoffman.  Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

This first major exhibition of the books displays 160 pages of the artist’s personal writings, sketches and notes, accompanied by other drawings, paintings and historical Basquiat ephemera. The pages on display often reveal a kind of evolution on many of the subjects he used in his more extensive paintings, along with those iconic motifs like figures, faces and crowns.

Page from Basquiat notebooks – Famous Negro Athletes.

Basquiat drawing – Famous Negro Athletes, 1981, oil stick on paper. Collection of Glenn O’Brien.

 

Basquiat developed a unique way of using language the way other artists used paint, or filmmakers use footage. The notebooks seem to be like mental scrapbooks for the artist to collect and manipulate phrases and ideas.

The exhibit presents them as “autonomous works” and not the “preparatory studies” of a sketchbook. But they do have a sketchbook feel to them, only these sketches are made with words instead of line and shadow.

This brings me back to the Beat Poets, and Kerouac in particular. On the back cover of my copy of the book: “Jack Kerouac Book of Sketches“, (Pengiun 2006), it says:

“…Ed White mentioned to Jack Kerouac ‘Why don’t you just sketch in the streets like a painter but with words.’ White’s suggestion is credited with helping to inspire Kerouac’s move to spontaneous prose.”

Here’s an excerpt from a Kerouac “sketch” in Massachusetts.

———————–

Concord River RR
Bridge
Sunday Oct 24 ’54
Lowel
5 PM
     A ridiculous NE
tumbleweed danced
across the RR bridge
     Thoreau’s Concord
is blue aquamarine
in October red
sereness — little
Indian hill towards
Walden, is orange
brown with Autumn
The faultless sky
attests to T’s solemn
wisdom being correct
— but perfect wisdom is Buddha’s

—————-

Many of these Basquiat notebook pages have a very similar feel…

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Basquiat – from Untitled Notebook #2, 1980–1981 – Collection of Larry Warsh, Copyright © Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Photo: Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum.

 

Just as other collage artists like Ray Johnson and Robert Rauschenberg collected little snippets physically from newspapers, letters and trash piles, to later assemble and re-arrange in their artworks, – Basquiat seems to have been collecting these snippets verbally instead. He collected them in the notebooks by writing them down when he read them, heard them, witnessed them, or just thought them up.

While many lines are filled with these intriguing collections of phrases, and developing ideas, other pages do indeed feel more like finished works of art on their own.

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Basquiat –  Untitled Notebook Page, circa 1987 – 

Collection of Larry Warsh. Copyright © Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Photo: Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum.

Looking closely at the intricate structures of words and lines on the pages, one can hardly resist recalling the obvious influences of seasoned contemporaries like Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly.

Basquiat – detail from page of Notebook #4 – Collection of Larry Warsh.

In addition to these rarely seen notebook pages, some of the more emblematic Basquiat works are traveling with the show. These larger compositions, canvasses and collages add a pleasing compliment to the exhibition.

Views from the show at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta.

Some of the most precious little items in the show are the rare mementos of the artist’s life, such as the Brooklyn Museum Junior Membership Card signed by a young Jean-Michel Basquiat.

And the unforgettable Polaroid photograph by cohort Andy Warhol.

Jean Michel – Basquiat Polaroid 1982 – by Andy Warhol on loan from private collection, seen at The High Museum of Art.

These additions provide a much wider scope for viewing the artist’s work, making this a unique opportunity for both longtime aficionados, and Basquiat newbies alike.

As notebook owner Larry Warsh expressed so perfectly in an April, 2015 Q&A article for Departures by Laura van Straaten:

“No one can have a complete picture of the inner workings of any artist, but the words on these pages give us a glimpse of the soul behind this complex, creative persona.”

While I highly recommend attending this exhibition if you can, I can’t help myself from wondering what else Warsh might have stashed in that closet of his…

Tour Schedule :

Brooklyn Museum, New York

April 3–August 23, 2015

High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia

February 28–May 29, 2016

Pérez Art Museum Miami, Florida

August 8–October 23, 2016

 

Links, Sources & Recommended reading:

 

Departures: “Q&A: Larry Warsh On Basquiat’s Notebooks” by Laura van Straaten

Financial Times: “Larry Warsh on his approach to collecting” by Peter Aspden

Gray History from the website of Michael Holman

http://plushsaferecords.com/

http://www.basquiat.com/artist-timeline.htm

The SAMO© Graffiti photographed by Henry Flynt

https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/touring/basquiat_notebooks http://www.high.org/Art/Exhibitions/Basquiat-Notebooks http://pamm.org/exhibitions/basquiat-unknown-notebooks

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TEXT AND PHOTOS BY LANCE ARAM ROTHSTEIN (except where noted.)

 

 


Vik Muniz Retrospective at High Museum

By guest contributor Karen Rothstein.

Now on exhibit until August 21, 2016 at The High Museum of Art in Atlanta, is a retrospective including more than 100 photographs by the Brazilian born mixed media artist Vik Muniz.

He has such a warm and enthusiastic manner. At the media preview, he expressed his overwhelming joy at seeing museum-goers actually taking close-up notice of all the unorthodox materials he used to create his artworks. Even the youngest child can find something in his work that brings them pleasure and perhaps engages them into taking an interest in the world of Art.

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The writer, Karen Rothstein with artist Muniz in front of his Self-Portrait: “I Am Too Sad to Tell You”, after Bas Jan Ader, from the “Rebus” series.

Muniz is known for trying to create a sense of wonder and intrigue within his photography. The way he creates each piece is unique, adding a plethora of unconventional items in the process of making each finished photograph. These things that you might be familiar with in their proper place, will all come as a surprise in his art. Things such as: tiny childhood toys, garbage, torn pieces of magazines, diamonds, food of all sorts, etc…. It is easy to see the artist has a playful sense of humor. The different textures and sizes of his working canvasses make each finished photograph very unique. For example, one project included large-scale drawings made by bulldozers on a construction site, while other images were made by assembling small pieces of garbage or tiny toys and then photographing them from above, to reveal the intended scene that he pictured in his head before it all started. Be sure to watch the video in the gallery, showing how he created “Mother and Child” from the “Pictures of Garbage” series.

Vik Muniz – Mother and Child  (Suellen)  from “Pictures of Garbage” series.

Muniz often makes several works in a series, using similar materials to explore a common theme, materials that often trigger the viewer’s memory, recalling another time and place.

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Vik Muniz – “Double Mona Lisa” (Peanut Butter and Jelly) from “After Warhol” series.

Vik Muniz – “Saturn devouring one of his sons” after Goya, from “Pictures of Junk Series.”

Vik Muniz – “Vik, 2 Years Old,”  from Pictures of Album series (representing one of the few pictures from his childhood)

Before moving to New York as a young man, Muniz was brought up in a working class family in Brazil while the country was under a strong military regime. People couldn’t speak their mind and times were hard. To this day he stands up for the underdog and addresses issues of social justice, and several of the works on display express the depth of his feelings.

 

Muniz Stinney

Vik Muniz – “George Stinney, Jr.” from “Pictures of Album” series  (Stinney was convicted at a flawed trial in 1944 at the age of 14 in South Carolina.)

 

Vik Muniz – Six children from the “Sugar Children” series (Children from sugar plantation workers who played in the sand on the Island of St. Kitts).

Muniz really loves to use all different textures and is intrigued with color pigmentation as seen in his wonderful rendering of Gauguin’s “Day of the Gods”. Look close, the colors and textures comes to life.

Vik Muniz – “Mahana No Atua” (Day of the Gods), after Gauguin, from “Pictures of Pigment” series.

Muniz is primarily working in series these days, but he started out in the 80’s doing sculpture. A fine example is on display, be sure to few his Mnemonic Vehicle (Ferrari Berlinetta) a composite of polyurethane, plexiglass and aluminum, portraying a nearly life-size Ferrari automobile as a massive matchbox car.

The Artist is a true master of creativity and composition, his work has been on display the world over. He currently works in  New York City and Rio de Janeiro.

This exhibit is a wonderful one and will make for great discussion with family and friends in days to follow.

Vik Muniz – A Bar at the Folies-Bergère after Édouard Manet, from the Pictures of Magazines 2 series.

The Vik Muniz exhibition runs through August 21, 2016 at The High Museum of Art in Atlanta. Visit www.high.org for more info.


SCOPE Art Miami 2014 Radiant with the Urban and Urbane.

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Thalassa by SWOON presented by The Dean Collection greets visitors inside the SCOPE main entrance.

The 14th SCOPE International Contemporary Art Show on Miami Beach expected nearly 40,000 visitors over the six day period, (ending 8pm Sunday Dec.7.)  Those visitors were treated to a kaleidoscope of works from more than 100 exhibitors, showing art from recent masters and groundbreaking upstarts alike.

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Detail of a piece by D*Face presented by The Dean Collection.

~ MIAMI BEACH ~ The increasing popularity of “street art” and its indelible impact on the contemporary art market was inherent in the prevalence of street-inspired work shown at SCOPE this year. While “street art” can’t really be considered as one particular style, the artwork by those who have chosen to “get up” on the streets has clearly made a permanent and pervasive mark on many artists working today. Some artists being exhibited did indeed start out working on the streets and later made the transition to gallery work. Others have adopted and adapted those various methods and used them in new and intriguing ways.

The Dean Collection presented works not for sale, curated by collector, hip-hop recording artist and producer Swizz Beatz. Artists included D*Face and SWOON (both shown above), who got their starts on the streets of London and New York respectively. And other, more traditional artists such as photographer and filmmaker Lyle Owerko were also shown. Masterful works from his Boom Box series proved popular with the Hip-Hop Set. Even Diddy & Busta Rhymes made appearances at the display.

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Metaphysics by Anne Deleporte 2014

L’Inlassable Galerie from Paris titled their exhibition Fake Idols, which contained some really unique work by Anne Deleporte who uses black gesso to obliterate works on paper. This results in a strong graphic presence that draws the viewer in to examine what she’s chosen to leave visible. Fans of metaphysical master Giorgio de Chirico will instantly recognize the remnants of his painting in Deleporte’s piece titled Metaphysical (above). Also in this booth were James Rielly, Edgar Sarin, Morten Viskum and Reinhard Voss.

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Skull with rabbit 2014 Jan Fabre

MAM Mario Mauroner Contemporary Art gallery based in, Austria, attracted visitors with work by acclaimed Belgian artist Jan Fabre (above). His pieces using Thai Jewel Beetle wing casings and other animal parts were a certain draw. Fabre has recently been invited to make a massive installation at the Russian State Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg in 2016. You can read more in our report here.

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MAM also presented Disaster by Spanish artist Carlos Aires using a series of laser-cut banknotes from around the world to form interesting juxtapositions which were sometimes brutal, and sometimes sarcastic, but always meaningful.

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California based Thinkspace Gallery featured mini-solo shows from Glenn Barr and Andy Kehoe.  Their Twitter account posted that they “sent 60 works to new homes” during the fair.  They also displayed a large wall grid of 60 – 12″x 12″ (30 x 30 cm) works by different artists.

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Among those was a dynamic collage by Florida artist Derek Gores.

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Depth Perfection – collage on canvas by Derek Gores

Thinkspace also presented two environmentally poignant pieces by San Francisco artist Jeremy Fish.

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Tough Talking Turtles Telling Tales – acrylic on hand-cut wood panel by Jeremy Fish

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Fowl Friends of the Fox – acrylic on hand-cut wood panel by Jeremy Fish

Stolenspace Gallery‘s space was chock-full of art by well-established street artists.  The London gallery appropriately carried work by The London Police.

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Bork & The Minions Save the Day ~ by The London Police

A shadow box by Belgian artist ROA was channeling the spirit of Joseph Cornell with his characteristically zoological inspired work.

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Mural Study Box I – by ROA

Next to the shadow box was a small portrait of Camille Claudel by renown street artist C215.

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Camille Claudel ~ mixed media on canvas by C215.

In addition to the medium-sized, mixed media collage on wooden panel by D*Face

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Wall Hugger I – by D*Face

There was a nifty little promotion from Stolenspace where visitors could pick a key from a pile, and check to see if it unlocked the chains surrounding a smaller D*Face work called Who’s Bad, with a sticker value of  $8000.

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Who’s Bad ~ mixed media on canvas by D*Face

Miami residents Gregory Jackson and Natalie Santiago (below) took their chances on the lock, but it wasn’t their lucky day.

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There was a lucky winner though and she was featured in the official D*Face Instagram Feed:

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Hashimoto Contemporary, out of San Francisco, had a very dynamic display. One wall that drew much attention held a trio of satirical paintings by Scott Scheidly portraying anti-gay, authoritarian leaders in fancy outfits of pink and lavender.

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Putin ~ acrylic on masonite by Scott Scheidly

By Thursday morning, each of the gaudy pink frames had a nice little red sticker beside their $3,500 price card.

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Castro, Kim Jong Un & Castro ~ acrylic on masonite by Scott Scheidly

Hashimoto also presented works by Shawn Huckins, Crystal Wagner, Handiedan, Joel Daniel Phillips, and Casey Weldon.

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Homebooster ~2014  spray paint on cardboard by EVOL

One of the most original and exciting artists on display this year was EVOL. Represented by the Jonathan LeVine Gallery, this Berlin street artist has gained wide acclaim recently for his innovative, urban, architectural illustrations, creating miniature buildings out of utility boxes and other surfaces in public spaces. His studio work often employs this same method on used cardboard boxes and the effect is mesmerizing.

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Low Reflection Area ~ 2014 spray paint on cardboard by EVOL

Altogether, this year’s SCOPE fair was very enthralling. There’s really too much to see in one day. With so many new artists, and as many different styles, it’s difficult to pinpoint any current trends without neglecting the outsiders.  And while the urban and street art influence is certainly an undeniable force, it seems more and more that “getting your artwork up and out on the streets” has become less of a circumvention of the traditional art market, and more of a pathway to gallery representation.

Stay tuned for further highlights from SCOPE, as well as reports from the ArtBasel and CONTEXT fairs.

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TEXT AND PHOTOS BY LANCE ARAM ROTHSTEIN


Jan Fabre set for groundbreaking show at Hermitage in St.Petersburg 2016

Belgian artist Jan Fabre has been invited to The Hermitage museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia, for a monumental, one-man exhibition in September 2016.

MIAMI BEACH – At the SCOPE International Contemporary Art Show in Miami Beach this week, Jan Fabre had several works being exhibited by MAM Mario Mauroner Contemporary Art gallery based in Vienna, Austria. Positioned near the main entrance, Fabre’s colorful and macabre pieces caught the eye of most visitors to the show.

"Skull with magpie" 2001 Jan Fabre

Skull with magpie 2001 Jan Fabre

His works using animal parts, such as Skull with magpie, include jewel-beetle wing cases and stuffed, dead animals. While they may provide some challenging visual images for inquisitive collectors, their iridescent attraction is undeniable.

MAM’s Judith Radlegger was among the gallery’s representatives at SCOPE, answering a virtually non-stop flow of questions from interested art lovers. But one of the most interesting tidbits she revealed was the recent announcement that Jan Fabre will have a massive exhibition at the Russian State Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg in 2016.

Fabre will be the first living artist to have such an exhibition at the historic venue, which is happening at the invitation of Hermitage Director, Mikhail Piotrovsky. It will be curated by Dimitri Ozerkov, who recently was in charge of the renovation and grand opening of their new contemporary art wing. Fabre’s installation will take up to 30 rooms in multiple buildings and is sure to make headlines and draw the attention of the international art world, as did a previous installation at the Belgian Royal Palace in 2002. The palace’s Mirror Room and chandelier were covered with the wings of more than one million beetles.

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Heaven of Delight (seen from below) 2002 Jan Fabre

At SCOPE Miami 2014, Fabre’s colorful pieces were also drawing attention, and many visitors stepped up close to the work to get a better look at the intricate beetle wings used to make the pieces. Encased behind glass, King Leopold II in the Air (from the series Hieronymus Bosch in Congo) utilized thousands of the tiny wings mounted on wood in the form of a crown.

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Detail from King Leopold II in the Air (from the series Hieronymus Bosch in Congo) 2012 Jan Fabre

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Skull with rabbit 2014 Jan Fabre

SCOPE runs through Sunday December 7th, but if you couldn’t make it to Miami this year, and you won’t be heading to Russia in 2016, you can catch one of his many other international exhibitions. Check out his currently running shows via his website here: http://janfabre.be/angelos/en/running/

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ALL TEXT AND PHOTOS BY LANCE ARAM ROTHSTEIN


Miami ArtWeek’14 – Wednesday 12/3

We haven’t even hit the shows yet but have already stumbled upon some great discoveries.

While taking a stroll down Lincoln Road Mall in search of some dinner, we were quickly confronted with the “ArtCenter South Florida” and their retrospective exhibition “Thirty Years on the Road,” curated by Edouard Duval-Carrié.

Some standouts from this show were Vicenta CasanIt’s Difficult to be Spiderman’s Mom” a 66.5″x51″ 2008 C-Print Photograph.

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And a 2012 piece by Kerry Phillips called “I’m The Worst When it Comes To…” this is a magnificent work of many multicolored, found sheets, folded neatly and stacked on a found table. You can see a different installation of this work on her site here: http://www.kerryphillipsart.com/stories

Also at ArtCenter South Florida are numerous artists’ gallery/exhibition spaces, and a walk through the well-lit labyrinth brought us to this large, humorous and savvy piece by Alejandro Vigilante.

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But by far my most favorite discovery from today was another artist in residence at the ArtCenter, Babette Herschberger. Her minimalist paintings on canvas and cardboard absolutely blew my mind!

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This quick snapshot doesn’t do justice to her subtile work. Seldom does something so simple make such a massive statement. I was really looking forward to seeing the EVOL works on cardboard at the SCOPE fair, but Herschberger’s “constructions” on cardboard are in a whole other (higher) class.
Here’s an example from her website:
babetteherschberger.com

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“Tidbit #54″ (collage, found cardboard, packing tape. 9.125″x7.875”)

I was so impressed with her original work and the warm welcome in her studio/gallery space. I hope to speak with her again soon and do a more in-depth post on her brilliant work. So watch this space.

Later on Wednesday evening, (after excellent dinner at Bella Cuba on Washington Ave. at Lincoln Rd.) we happened upon the David Castillo Gallery Pop-up on Lincoln Road, which will be open through January 31, 2015.
The un-missable, 1971 neon piece, shining through the window by Rafael Ferrer “Artforhum (Red, White & Blue)”, was really the only thing that could be appreciated during their closed, evening hours.

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But the reviews indicate it’s worth a trip back there to see the rest of the show. And the exhibition space definitely looked intriguing.

Okay, hitting the hay for tonight. Hoping to hit SCOPE & ArtBasil tomorrow!


Labeauratoire headed to Miami ArtWeek 2014

Labeauratoire is headed to Miami Beach for Art Week 2014.

Be sure to follow @lancephoto on Twitter for some live updates.

We’ll be covering several of the major art fairs including (but not limited to) Art Basil Miami Beach, Context Art Miami, and the SCOPE Miami Beach fair.

There are a few artists we’re excited to see on this trip. I’ve been following Jane Maxwell online for several years and am looking forward to  finally seeing her work in person at CONTEXT Art Miami.

New Sculptures @ Context Art Miami: December 2-7 | Caldwell Snyder Booth E41.

Jane Maxwell – New Sculptures @ Context Art Miami: December 2-7 | Caldwell Snyder Booth E41.

“The exhibitions and programs at CONTEXT will be even bigger and more impressive than in previous years,” said CONTEXT Director Julian Navarro. “In addition to showcasing a solid group of international galleries, CONTEXT is unique in that it will feature a series of solo artist projects, curated spaces, unique programming, conversations and events – all aimed to immerse and entertain our attendees.”

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We caught a great Street Art show at a little gallery in Belgium back in 2012 where the work of EVOL really caught the eye. Here’s a new piece by this innovative artist. We’re hoping to view it at SCOPE.

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EVOL, Summer TV Classic, 2014 Spray paint on cardboard Courtesy of Jonathan LeVine Gallery

“Celebrating its 14th year of introducing galleries to the contemporary market, SCOPE returns to its location on the sands of Miami Beach with 126 International Exhibitors from 27 countries and 48 cities. “

Also at SCOPE we’ll be looking for the Heineken house…

“The Heineken House is a multi-sensory experience, featuring a Live Art Pyramid as the core. Standing over 35ft tall, the pyramid features 12 massive live art walls to be hand-painted live during SCOPE Miami Beach. The interior features a covered bar serving ice cold Heineken, while the exterior provides seating for patrons to witness the transformation of this multifunctional installation.”

Here we hope to see the collage artist Derek Gores working live on sight in the Pyramid.  I recently encountered Gores at his gallery in Melbourne, Florida, and he’s also having an exhibition with Thinkspace Gallery at the Aqua Art Miami show.

“Aqua Art Miami opens Wednesday in perhaps my biggest show yet, and new directions shown for the first time. If you can’t make it in person, request a collection preview by writing contact (at) thinkspacegallery (dot) com … Here we go Miami ~ #aquaartmiami #thinkspacegallery “

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And of course we’ll be spending time at the massive ArtBasil Fair.

© Courtesy of Art Basel

“FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT ART BASEL IN MIAMI BEACH
Art Basel takes place at the Miami Beach Convention Center (MBCC).
Over 500,000 square feet of exhibition space host the Galleries, Nova, Positions, Edition, Kabinett and Magazines sectors, as well as Conversations and Salon. Public artworks are shown nearby at Collins Park, while Film is presented across two venues, inside the MBCC and in the outdoor setting of Sound Scape Park. – In 2013 the show attracted an attendance of 75,0000 over the five show days.”

Art Basel is sure to be a magnificent event and just as surely waaaayyy too much to see in the one day we’ll be there. So here’s just a short glance of some of the galleries we hope to catch there:

Acquavella Galleries, Gallerie 1900-2000, Xavier Hufkens Gallery, Gagosian Gallery, & White Cube.

If you’re headed down to Miami as well, be sure to look for the ArtBasil APP for your devise. It’s a killer!

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Be sure to follow @lancephoto on Twitter for some live updates, if I’m not too busy on the beach 😉